Apple Tree Movers Wanted – October 28

On Apples, Pick-up Trucks and Food Security

The Community Forest project needs a pick-up truck or vehicle with a trailer to collect a MacIntosh apple tree from the Just Food Farm in Blackburn Hamlet (near Orleans) and bring it to the neighbourhood. Thursday afternoon (October 28) or Friday during the day would be ideal. If you have access to truck or trailer, please contact Daniel Buckles (613-807-8048).

The apple will be the last planting of the season in the new terraces at Champlain Park, along with two American Hazelnuts (a native shrub with showy flowers and edible nuts). Our Community Forest will not only showcase a native “Tiny Forest” east along Pontiac, a “Native Pollinator Garden” at the entrance to the river, and a glimpse at “futures forests” in our warming world, but also options for “Food Forests” in urban environments.

“Where will our food come from?” is a question posed in the context of Ottawa’s new Official Plan in an opinion piece by a neighbour you might find of interest here.

Update from the “Pit Crew” of Champlain Park.

[A bowl full of apples]

Caterpillar Voracious Appetites

Now is the time to protect trees from caterpillars with voracious appetites.

Heritage bur oaks in our neighbourhood are being attacked by the gypsy moth caterpillar. In fact, all deciduous trees are at risk from the caterpillar. So are conifers.

Here’s what you can do to protect any tree in your yard (or in the park):
https://www.champlainoaks.net/post/copy-of-protect-your-bur-oaks-from-gypsy-moth-caterpillars

[Oak tree with burlap sack circumference guard]

Trees Still Available for Planting – Reminder

Following up on the previous post about saplings being available:

Date: Mon, 27 Apr 2020 15:25:28 -0400
From: DANIEL BUCKLES <dbuckles@sas2.net>

Spring time trees

Are you one of the lucky ones with a front yard unimpeded by hydro wires? Do you have a backyard with space to breath? Want to start the next generation of the elder tree in your yard? There are still a few baby Bur Oaks (Heritage Champlain Oaks) and baby Sugar Maples available from my backyard nursery. They will become big trees, so not for tiny spaces. Curb side pick up available at Daniel Avenue, by sending an email to dbuckles@sas2.net.

Trees available for Planting

Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2020 17:02:16 -0400
From: DANIEL BUCKLES <dbuckles@sas2.net>

Want to plant a tree, while practicing physical distancing in your yard? I have Champlain Oaks (Heritage Bur Oaks) and Sugar Maples in pots, available for you to pick up. These are very small saplings, but in 20 years will grow to be very large trees! They need room to grow, so may be best suited to backyards or frontyards with no obstructions.

Call Daniel at 613-807-8048 to arrange to pick up at the end of my driveway.

Heritage Trees

From: Debra Huron <debra@debrahuron.com>
Date: Wed, 06 Dec 2017 16:16:10 -0500

From Daniel Buckles via Champlain Oaks website http://www.champlainoaks.com/2017/11/calling-all-heritage-trees/


Calling all heritage trees

[Oak Tree between the SJAM Parkway roads]On the heels of September’s ceremony to honour heritage trees in Ottawa, Forests Ontario has confirmed that it can list more bur oaks from this neighbourhood in its provincial registry.

The deadline for nominating a tree to Forests Ontario’s heritage tree program is December 31, 2017.
Continue reading “Heritage Trees”

Legacy Trees Carry on Forest Genes

(longer version with photos at http://www.champlainoaks.com/2017/09/legacy-trees-carry-on-forest-genes/)

Discovering the family story DNA can tell reminds us of just how diverse genetic roots can be in a human life. Farmers know that the genetic variations within wheat, corn, millets and other food plants hold the key to disease resistance and future food security.

The same value comes from keeping forest genes going. The genes of the bur oaks honoured in Champlain Park on National Tree Day are an unbroken genetic code from the end of the last Ice Age 10,000 years ago. Over multiple generations, the cycle of acorn to mature tree has repeated itself in our neighbourhood over and over again. Along the way, the offspring adapted to the thin soils, dry spells and periodic flooding of the Ottawa River shoreline between Chaudière Falls and Des Chênes Rapids. More recently, they adapted to life in the city.
Continue reading “Legacy Trees Carry on Forest Genes”

Bur Oaks to Receive Heritage Status – September 27

Daniel Buckles writes:

On National Tree Day (Wednesday, September 27) Forests Ontario will be at the Steve and Kay Kot house (124 Cowley) at 10 AM to announce the induction of four “Champlain Oaks” into the provincial Heritage Tree program. Three other trees (on Keyworth and Daniel Ave) are also being acknowledged in the Heritage Tree Program.

Here is a link to the Champlain Oaks announcement and profiles of 4 trees that will receive heritage status from Forests Ontario on National Tree Day 2017. http://www.champlainoaks.com/2017/09/forests-ontario-to-honour-bur-oaks-as-heritage-trees/

Join us to celebrate trees and the natural heritage of our community.

Invitation to contribute to the local Community Forest

The Champlain Park Community Association (CPCA) and the National Capital Commission (NCC) have entered into an agreement to cooperate in the management of the forested area on NCC land between Northwestern Avenue and Island Park Drive north of Premier Avenue. This agreement enables the CPCA to promote and facilitate community projects aimed at improving the forest area. Following is a statement of the goals and objectives of the programme and guidelines for individuals and groups that wish to contribute ideas, time and resources.

The NCC forest bordering our community is an integral part of the community experience. Transformed from its natural state by cottage development in the 1900s and severely damaged by the 1998 ice storm, it currently serves as an area for walking, a home for wildlife and a buffer between the community and traffic on the Ottawa River Parkway.

The overall goal of the Community Forest Management Programme is to bring improvements to the forest consistent with the following objectives:

  • A gradual succession of the flora and fauna towards a mature forest comprised of native species of trees, shrubs and ground cover;
  • Removal of and strict avoidance of plant species known to be invasive or inappropriate to a native forest;
  • Maintaining a safe, accessible and litter-free environment for people of all ages;
  • Supporting opportunities for educational and recreational experiences in the forest and;
  • Enhancing pathways and connections between Champlain Park, the Ottawa River and the broader community

An informal Committee has been established to promote and facilitate community projects consistent with the overall goals and specific objectives of the programme.

A bur oak named "Canada Day 2015"
A bur oak named “Canada Day 2015”

 

The first action under the agreement with the NCC was the planting on Canada Day (2015) of a local bur oak sapling 10 metres to the west of the Carleton entrance to the forest. It is protected by a small fence, and watered by nature and dog walkers.

 

 
The Committee plans to develop a list of about 10 projects to be submitted in late February to the NCC as an initial set for their approval. Other projects will be added periodically. Projects discussed so far include:

  1. An inventory and mapping of current forest cover (trees, shrubs and ground cover, distinguishing between native, invasive and inappropriate species);
  2. Safe removal in selected areas of invasive and harmful plant species including Poison Ivy, Garlic mustard, Honey suckle, Japanese knot weed, and Dog strangling vine;
  3. Collection of deadwood from selected areas for chipping by the NCC and redistribution of wood chips to improve existing pathways;
  4. Planting in selected areas seed or cuttings of native species, with particular attention to shrubs (for example, xxx) and ground cover (trillium, xxx);
  5. Placement by the NCC of a garbage can at the Patricia Avenue entrance to the forest;
  6. Interpretive signs in a few locations describing some of the natural and cultural features of the forest;
  7. Naming the forest in a way recognizes the human and natural heritage of the area

You are invited to contribute project ideas or give time and resources to bring about improvements to the forest. You can do so by contacting members of the programme committee listed below.

If you have a specific project to suggest,

  • Outline in writing what it is you wish to do and indicate where in the forest it would happen (we will have a map with grid sections available shortly, for easy reference);
  • State how the project fits into the overall goal and specific objectives of the programme.
  • Indicate who will be involved, and how you intend to safely mobilize the people and other resources needed.

Approved projects will operate under the general protection of the CPCA liability insurance policy.

Discuss your ideas with any of the following committee members: Adrian Bradley (chair), Daniel Buckles, Eloise Holland, Roland Dorsay, John Arnason, Dennis Vanstaalduinen, Nick Xenos, Jen Neate and Allan Ramunas.