Patricia Oak News

via Daniel…

Daniel Buckles published today an OPED in the Ottawa Citizen on the loss of the Patricia Avenue “Party Tree” and the importance of heritage trees and planting native/near-native species to the urban canopy. The pre-confederation tree was irreparably damaged in last month’s big derecho storm. Please share as you see fit.

https://ottawacitizen.com/opinion/buckles-ode-to-the-party-tree-a-reminder-of-why-ottawas-urban-canopy-matters

[Giant Bur Oak on Patricia]

Patricia Oak Celebration – June 14

Celebration of life

Patricia Avenue neighbours invite one and all to gather opposite 203 Patricia Avenue to celebrate the life of an old-growth burr oak on the street. It is known as “The Party Tree” because for years the shade of the tree hosted the Patricia Avenue Labour Day street party.

The tree is being removed by Forestry Services on Wednesday, June 15 because it was irreparably damaged by the recent fierce storm (derecho).

Drop by tomorrow (Tuesday, June 14) between 7 and 8 pm, to share stories with neighbours about this and other significant trees. The Patricia Bur Oak is one of only a handful of pre-confederation trees in the neighbourhood, linked genetically to the ancient oak forest that developed along this stretch of the Ottawa River some 9,000 years ago (for details on the history, see https://www.champlainoaks.net/).

[Giant Bur Oak on Patricia]

Greener Greenspace Award

via Daniel…

Champlain Park has been recognized by The Society for Organic Urban Land Care (SOUL) as a 2021 Greener Greenspace award winner. The evaluation committee “particularly appreciated that your project makes the most out of the opportunity to turn a paved street into regenerative gardens and model forests that not only benefit local wildlife and the urban forest but provide opportunities to engage the public.”

Yahoo! And thanks to the volunteers that made it happen (Daniel Buckles, Kris Philipps, Catherine Shearer, John Arnason, Adrian Bradley, Joscelyn Coolihan), and to the Champlain Park Community Association for moral and financial support.

[Greener Greenspace round logo]

[Rectangular Certificate]
Greener Greenspace Champlain Park Certificate of Recognition 2021.pdf

Apple Tree Movers Wanted – October 28

On Apples, Pick-up Trucks and Food Security

The Community Forest project needs a pick-up truck or vehicle with a trailer to collect a MacIntosh apple tree from the Just Food Farm in Blackburn Hamlet (near Orleans) and bring it to the neighbourhood. Thursday afternoon (October 28) or Friday during the day would be ideal. If you have access to truck or trailer, please contact Daniel Buckles (613-807-8048).

The apple will be the last planting of the season in the new terraces at Champlain Park, along with two American Hazelnuts (a native shrub with showy flowers and edible nuts). Our Community Forest will not only showcase a native “Tiny Forest” east along Pontiac, a “Native Pollinator Garden” at the entrance to the river, and a glimpse at “futures forests” in our warming world, but also options for “Food Forests” in urban environments.

“Where will our food come from?” is a question posed in the context of Ottawa’s new Official Plan in an opinion piece by a neighbour you might find of interest here.

Update from the “Pit Crew” of Champlain Park.

[A bowl full of apples]

Caterpillar Voracious Appetites

Now is the time to protect trees from caterpillars with voracious appetites.

Heritage bur oaks in our neighbourhood are being attacked by the gypsy moth caterpillar. In fact, all deciduous trees are at risk from the caterpillar. So are conifers.

Here’s what you can do to protect any tree in your yard (or in the park):
https://www.champlainoaks.net/post/copy-of-protect-your-bur-oaks-from-gypsy-moth-caterpillars

[Oak tree with burlap sack circumference guard]

Trees Still Available for Planting – Reminder

Following up on the previous post about saplings being available:

Date: Mon, 27 Apr 2020 15:25:28 -0400
From: DANIEL BUCKLES <dbuckles@sas2.net>

Spring time trees

Are you one of the lucky ones with a front yard unimpeded by hydro wires? Do you have a backyard with space to breath? Want to start the next generation of the elder tree in your yard? There are still a few baby Bur Oaks (Heritage Champlain Oaks) and baby Sugar Maples available from my backyard nursery. They will become big trees, so not for tiny spaces. Curb side pick up available at Daniel Avenue, by sending an email to dbuckles@sas2.net.

Trees available for Planting

Date: Fri, 17 Apr 2020 17:02:16 -0400
From: DANIEL BUCKLES <dbuckles@sas2.net>

Want to plant a tree, while practicing physical distancing in your yard? I have Champlain Oaks (Heritage Bur Oaks) and Sugar Maples in pots, available for you to pick up. These are very small saplings, but in 20 years will grow to be very large trees! They need room to grow, so may be best suited to backyards or frontyards with no obstructions.

Call Daniel at 613-807-8048 to arrange to pick up at the end of my driveway.

Heritage Trees

From: Debra Huron <debra@debrahuron.com>
Date: Wed, 06 Dec 2017 16:16:10 -0500

From Daniel Buckles via Champlain Oaks website http://www.champlainoaks.com/2017/11/calling-all-heritage-trees/


Calling all heritage trees

[Oak Tree between the SJAM Parkway roads]On the heels of September’s ceremony to honour heritage trees in Ottawa, Forests Ontario has confirmed that it can list more bur oaks from this neighbourhood in its provincial registry.

The deadline for nominating a tree to Forests Ontario’s heritage tree program is December 31, 2017.
Continue reading “Heritage Trees”

Legacy Trees Carry on Forest Genes

(longer version with photos at http://www.champlainoaks.com/2017/09/legacy-trees-carry-on-forest-genes/)

Discovering the family story DNA can tell reminds us of just how diverse genetic roots can be in a human life. Farmers know that the genetic variations within wheat, corn, millets and other food plants hold the key to disease resistance and future food security.

The same value comes from keeping forest genes going. The genes of the bur oaks honoured in Champlain Park on National Tree Day are an unbroken genetic code from the end of the last Ice Age 10,000 years ago. Over multiple generations, the cycle of acorn to mature tree has repeated itself in our neighbourhood over and over again. Along the way, the offspring adapted to the thin soils, dry spells and periodic flooding of the Ottawa River shoreline between Chaudière Falls and Des Chênes Rapids. More recently, they adapted to life in the city.
Continue reading “Legacy Trees Carry on Forest Genes”