Category Archives: Trees

Tree discussions and other related material. There are lots of trees in the neighbourhood, and a fair amount of tree related conflict with development, which means quite a few posts are tree related. Not everything is Champlain Oaks Project, thus this more general tree category.

Encore! Biodiversity Celebration Continues – October 6

Encore! Biodiversity Celebration Continues Wednesday, October 6, 4:00 to 5:00 pm.

Eastern Bumblebee on Cosmos Sulphureus (Golden Cosmos), by Grace Nault, a young resident of Champlain Park.

Some 15 hardy souls braved the cool wet weather on Saturday to plant more than 40 trees into our latest “Tiny Forest”, including a collection of “Carolinian Forest” species to complement our “Native Pollinator Garden”.

See details on each through the links above, and tour the site with local experts on Wednesday, October 6 from 4:00 to 5:00 pm. Location? The north end of Champlain Park, at Pontiac and Cowley Avenue in Kitchissippi Ward, Ottawa. Plant acorns from our Heritage Bur Oaks and share ideas on how to start your own neighbourhood biodiversity and tree canopy projects.
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Caterpillar Voracious Appetites

Now is the time to protect trees from caterpillars with voracious appetites.

Heritage bur oaks in our neighbourhood are being attacked by the gypsy moth caterpillar. In fact, all deciduous trees are at risk from the caterpillar. So are conifers.

Here’s what you can do to protect any tree in your yard (or in the park):
https://www.champlainoaks.net/post/copy-of-protect-your-bur-oaks-from-gypsy-moth-caterpillars

[Oak tree with burlap sack circumference guard]

Plants Need Help

Tom Sawyer’s Life Lesson

Mark Twain’s brilliant story about the Adventures of Tom Sawyer shows that “to make someone covet a thing, it is only necessary to make the thing difficult to attain.” Tom Sawyer, when his friend asked why he was not distressed about having to paint his Aunt Polly’s fence, simply said, “I don’t see why I would be, you don’t get to do this everyday.” Within a few hours, every one of his friends was vying for the opportunity to paint the fence, even paying him in kind (apples and precious pieces of string) for the privilege.

Well, we have some difficult things to challenge you that are also important enough for you to want to take on the challenge.

What are we talking about? Keeping 180 trees and a pollinator garden alive and thriving during a dry spring and summer is both difficult to attain and important to beautifying our neighbourhood. We are also trying to recover the abandoned former parking lot at Pontiac and the Park as a future tree planting site. Your contribution can make a difference, by taking on responsibility for a few hours in our watering schedule or by doing other tree or earth moving care. We have a pretty good system in place, but need more helping hands.

[Saplings with Stakes on Pontiac where there were parking spaces]

If this amazing opportunity to bring biodiversity into the neighbourhood is something you want to be part of, contact Daniel Buckles (dbuckles@sas2.net) for a brief orientation and access to the online schedule. The project is an initiative of the Champlain Park Community Association.

Forest Artists with Don Monet

Are you a struggling student artist? Work with a pro and help your neighbourhood too by documenting the amazing green transformation going on right here in Champlain Park.

If you have been down to the river you will have seen the pollinator garden at the end of Carleton, and the “Tiny Forest” that has popped up along Pontiac.

[Black Walnut Way - tree planting along Pontiac Street]

There are other delights in the woods too that are the fruit of local volunteers with the Champlain Park Community Association.

We would like your help (photographers, painters, sculptors, etc.) to showcase the plant biodiversity and volunteer spirit we are bringing into the neighbourhood.

Don Monet, painter and owner of Ottawa’s CUBE Gallery, lives here too and would be happy to mentor or otherwise support you in a local art project focused on the green transformation. If interested, contact Daniel Buckles (daniel.buckles@gmail.com) for a virtual introduction to Don.

Homes Wanted for Tree Saplings

Are you willing to provide a foster home for a tree sapling?

[Small Oak Sapling - just a leaf]

The Champlain Park Enviro Committee is looking for caretakers of small, potted trees that will eventually make their way into public spaces in the community. The term for taking care of plants can range from a few months to two years, depending on species and how quickly we can find a permanent home. Learn about and share your knowledge of native trees, shrubs and herbaceous plants, while also helping to create a legacy urban forest and healthy environment.

If you would be interested in becoming a member of our Caretaker Network, volunteering as Champlain Park Plant Caretaker, please complete the Caretaker registration form  and one of the Project Coordinators will get back you.

Thanking you in advance for your interest.

For more details on the Champlain Park Plant Caretaker please visit the Projects homepage

Big Trees and Mechanicsville Promoting Trees vs Embassies

Via Heather and Daniel:

Mechanicsville Community Association and Big Trees of Kitchissippi invite you to make your voice count in efforts to say YES to more trees and No to embassies at the NCC Burnside property on the Ottawa River in Kitchissippi Ward.

[Poster for More Trees Here]

First, send a video message (hug) to Councillors and Federal Ministers before Earth Day next week, using this simple video platform: https://app.vidhug.com/yes-to-trees-no-to-embassies-/HyZ-FoNL_/record

Use your phone, or record directly on the platform, indoors or (preferably) outdoors to say Yes (and No).

Second, sign this petition calling on the City of Ottawa and NCC to honour their commitments to addressing the climate emergency, by saying Yes to more trees on the site, and No to embassies:  See Petition

Trees, Birds and Money

Subject: Trees and birds, oh the joy of it
Date: Sun, 28 Mar 2021 11:27:16 -0400
From: Daniel Buckles <dbuckles@sas2.net>

Trees help make Champlain Park a special neighbourhood in this part of the city, and no doubt add to the property value and enjoyment of residents (studies show generally a 10-15% increase in property value due to trees, and many direct human health benefits as well).

Native tree species are particularly important because they harbour native insects that recognize them as food sources and good places to lay their eggs. The Norway Maple and Japanse Lilac, while lovely in their own way, confuse insects looking for food and habitat, making them less desirable tree species for a healthy ecosystem. The same logic applies to shrubs and herbaceous plants: native is better for insects.

Anywhere insects go, birds follow. If you enjoy birds, Champlain Park and the nearby woods have lots to offer, including a recent visit from a flock of Bohemian Waxwings and perennial sightings of the solitary Pileated Woodpecker (among many others).

It now seems that birds make us as happy as money, in fact, an extra $190 a month according to a study of 25 European countries. Check out a media report on the study here: https://nationalpost.com/news/world/birds-make-you-as-happy-as-money-study-finds

NCC Forest Feedback

Public consultation on the NCC Forest Strategy

The National Capital Commission (NCC) invites you to participate in an online public consultation on its Forest Strategy.

This strategy will guide how the NCC manages forests and trees on its lands. It will align our efforts, and prepare us to meet current and future challenges. Previous rounds of public consultation on the strategy were held in June and October 2019. We are now in the final phase of developing this strategy.

Through this online consultation, you’ll have an opportunity to:

  • learn about the context of the strategy, including the challenges affecting our trees and forests;
  • review the strategy’s proposed vision, goals, long-term objectives and short-term actions;
  • read the full draft of the strategy; and
  • provide feedback on the strategy before it is finalized.

We invite you to provide your input via the comment box on the Forest Strategy webpage from February 16 to March 3, 2021.

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40 Elgin St, Ottawa | 40, rue Elgin, Ottawa
613-239-5000
1-800-465-1867 toll free | sans frais
info@ncc-ccn.ca

Objections to New Embassy Row + February 10 Webinar

Date: Mon, 8 Feb 2021 08:38:55 -0500
From: DANIEL BUCKLES <dbuckles@sas2.net>
Subject: Solidarity with Mechanicsville Community Association

[…] The affected lands are very close to us so is relevant to our neighbourhood as well, and likely to become even more relevant over time. […]

Please write to the NCC CEO Tobi Nussbaum (c/o assistant Sarah.Skrzek@ncc-ccn.ca) to indicate your solidarity with a call by the Mechanicsville Community Association and Big Trees of Kitchissippi to withdraw its plan to build diplomatic offices and parking lots on prime greenspace along the Ottawa River. Consider participating as well in an online forum on the development hosted by Councillor Leiper.
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SJAM Winter Trail – Christmas Tree Reuse

The SJAM Winter Trail is collecting cleaned up Christmas Trees for use as a windbreak. Yes, your #xmas2020 tree still have a lot more lovin’ to give! Your little sweet heart can spend the rest of the winter sheltering the wind and making this rest area, or what we call the #NordicVillage, a winter’s paradise. @NCC_CCN

We are accepting your recycled Christmas Trees at 2 locations:

Remic Rapids Park

Champlain Park

  • Behind the Baseball diamond net in the Champlain Park

[Christmas trees stacked up against the baseball diamond fence at Champlain Park, Ottawa, ready for a bonfire or windbreak]

Many thanks, these trees will be further recycled as mulch after the winter season.